What is the AIA?

"The Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) is North America's oldest and largest organization devoted to the world of archaeology with over 200,000 members belonging to more than 100 local AIA societies in the United States, Canada, and overseas, united by a shared passion for archaeology and its role in furthering human knowledge."

Join AIA NOLA

You can become a member of AIA NOLA by joining the Archaeological Institute of America and indicating your interest in the New Orleans Society. Memberships include a subscription either to the American Journal of Archaeology or to Archaeology magazine. Student memberships are available.

Go to the AIA website for more details and to join!

 

Upcoming lectures

  • Oct 2012
  • Feb 2013
  • Apr 2013

GHOST SHIPS OF THE  KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH


A Lecture by
Dr. Robyn Woodward
The Anna Marguerite McCann and Robert D. Taggart Lectureship in Underwater Archaeology

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
Nunemaker Auditorium
Monroe Hall, 3rd floor
8 pm
free admission and free parking on campus

Since 2005 a small team of volunteer underwater archaeologists and surveyors have been in a race against time to document the historic shipwrecks along the Yukon River between from Lake Bennett north to Dawson City in Canada’s northern Yukon Territory.   Of the 290-plus sternwheelers and steam-tugs known to have plied the river only two intact vessels survive as National Historic sites. This fleet of ships was the primary method of transportation during the great Klondike and later Alaska Gold Rushes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During the fall “ice-up” ships were either pulled ashore or backed into sloughs to prevent them from being crushed and as a result, numerous vessels were abandoned in remote locations.  Collectively, the Yukon River “ghost fleet” represents the largest and best-preserved collections of western river sternwheelers many of which exhibit features of nautical architecture that is reminiscent of pre-Civil war vessels. Dr. Woodward will present an illustrated lecture on the history, landscape and vessels of this dynamic period of North American history.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the Classical Studies program and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

For more information, contact Prof. Connie Rodriguez, rodrigue@loyno.edu.

Sacred Art from the Armenian Orthodox Churches of Istanbul


A Lecture by
Dr. Ronald Marchese

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Nunemaker Auditorium
Monroe Hall, 3rd floor
8 pm
free admission and free parking on campus

Like many collections, the Armenian Orthodox Church treasuries in Istanbul contain objects that were never meant to be displayed in a museum or appear in a book. Their primary purpose was to serve, honor, and glorify God. Acquired over many centuries, such objects were more than metal, stone, wood, and definitely more than complicated composition and elaborate iconography. They were a physical testament to religious belief that symbolized the intense spiritual convictions of the lay community.

The objects under study – those that make up a corpus of previously unstudied and unknown artifacts - are a physical reminder and tribute to a people who tenaciously maintained a national identity through the objects they produced, donated, and used in the celebration of their faith. They defined a unique style of religious art, the “Constantinople Style” that reflected the opulence and grandeur of a city many Armenians came to love as their own. Through their labor the city and the Church prospered and, in time, the community became one of the most important ethnic groups in Istanbul.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the Classical Studies program and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

For more information, contact Prof. Connie Rodriguez, rodrigue@loyno.edu.

Living low on the seas of Late Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean


A Lecture by
Dr. Nicolle Hirshfeld


The Kershaw Lectures in Near East Archaeology
Archaeological Institute of America

Monday, April 8, 2013
Nunemaker Auditorium
Monroe Hall, 3rd floor
8 pm
free admission and free parking on campus

In the summer of 2010, fifty years after the excavation that pioneered underwater archaeology as a scientific discipline, the lecturer co-directed, with George Bass and a Turkish colleague, Harun Özdaş, a return to Gelidonya.  The starting point for this lecture is a report on that season and what more we have learned about the shipwreck since the publication of the original excavation.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the Classical Studies program and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

For more information, contact Prof. Connie Rodriguez, rodrigue@loyno.edu.