Brain and Language: LING 4110/4890/5110 & NSCI 4110/4891/6110, Fall 2013

Objectives: The objective of this course is to understand: how the brain is organized to produce and comprehend language, the time course of linguistic processing, and the linguistic disorders attendant on brain damage. 

CLASSROOM COMPONENT

SERVICE-LEARNING OPTION

Place and time: 2:00-2:50 pm, Dinwiddie 102

Graduate section: TBA

Place and time: You are required to work for 20 hours in a context of linguistic assessment and treatment. You must register for LING 4890-11 or NSCI 4891-11( NSCI 6892-11).

Textbook: The textbook used in this course is John C. L. Ingram (2007) Neurolinguistics.

Timesheets: You are responsible for keeping track of your service hours and for getting them approved by your on-site supervisor. Your hours should be reported twice during the semester to the Center for Public Service, on the dates indicated in the schedule.

Other readings & videos: Most of the readings are pdf files of journal articles, available on the Blackboard site for the class. We will also see a video in class.

Written Reflection: You must keep a journal of your daily experiences in the clinical context, using the class’s Blackboard site. Also, from time to time you will be asked to respond to questions on the discussion board.

You should come to class having read and mulled over the readings listed for that day in the schedule. Use the texts as a resource to clarify lecture material and to deepen your own appreciation of topics of interest.

Training Session: You must attend a training session (2 hours including transport) TBA. As a courtesy to our community partners, no make-ups will be scheduled.

OUTCOMES
For you to demonstrate your understanding of the objectives of the course, you will perform the following tasks:

  1. Take a quiz, during the first 10 minutes of most Monday classes, covering the material since the previous Monday. No make-up quizzes will be given, but you may drop one. (11-1 * 7.5% = 75%)
  2. Prepare a final project, explained on a separate sheet. Graduate students are expected to put more effort into the final project. (25%)
  3. Extra credit: Undergraduates may participate as subjects in an EEG experiment; graduate students may participate in and help run the experiment (up to 3%)
  1. execution of service-learning responsibilities (timesheets, etc.)
  2. the written reflection will be done as a journal on Blackboard

CONTACTS

Prof. Harry Howard

862-3417 (voice mail 24 hours a day)
Newcomb Hall 322-D, MTW 4-5 pm & by appt
http://www.tulane.edu/~howard/LING4110/

Bridget Smith
Senior Program Coordinator, Campus-Community Partnerships
Tulane University's Center for Public Service
327 Gibson Hall
o: (504) 862-3322
f: (504) 862-8061
bridget1 at tulane dot edu

Code of Academic Conduct

 “The integrity of Newcomb-Tulane College is based on the absolute honesty of the entire community in all academic endeavors. As part of the Tulane University community, students have certain responsibilities regarding work that forms the basis for the evaluation of their academic achievement. Students are expected to be familiar with these responsibilities at all times. No member of the university community should tolerate any form of academic dishonesty, because the scholarly community of the university depends on the willingness of both instructors and students to uphold the Code of Academic Conduct. When a violation of the Code of Academic Conduct is observed it is the duty of every member of the academic community who has evidence of the violation to take action. Students should take steps to uphold the code by reporting any suspected offense to the instructor or the associate dean of the college. Students should under no circumstances tolerate any form of academic dishonesty.” For further information, point your browser at http://college.tulane.edu/code.htm.

Violations of the Code of Academic Integrity will not be tolerated in this class. I will rigorously investigate and pursue any such transgression.

Students with disabilities who need academic accommodation should:

Schedule of assignments, Fall 2013

John C. L. Ingram (2007) Neurolinguistics.

Date

Day

Topic

Sources

ppt

mp3

Q

Service learning

Aug 26 (M)

1

Introduction to the course

  PowerPoint --    

28 (W)

2
Introduction & overview I §1 PowerPoint mp3    

30 (F)

3

Aspects of linguistic competence: design features

I §2 PowerPoint mp3    

Sept 2 (M)

--

LABOR DAY

         

4 (W)

4
Aspects of linguistic competence: phonetics, phonology I §2 PowerPoint mp3    

6 (F)

5
Aspects of linguistic competence: prosody & morphology I §2 PowerPoint mp3    

9 (M)

6
Aspects of linguistic competence: semantics I §2 PowerPoint --

Q1

 

11 (W)

7

Aspects of linguistic competence: syntax & summary

I §3 PowerPoint mp3    

13 (F)

8

The neuroanatomy of language 1

I §3 PowerPoint mp3    

16 (M)

9

--

-- -- --

Q2

 

18 (W)

10

The neuroanatomy of language 2

I §3 PowerPoint mp3  

Orientations

20 (F)

11

The neuroanatomy of language 3

I §3 PowerPoint mp3  

"

23 (M)

12

The neuroanatomy of language 4

I §3 PowerPoint mp3

Q3

"

25 (W)

13

On modularity

I §4 PowerPoint mp3  

"

27 (F)

14

The problem of speech recognition 1

I §5

PowerPoint mp3    

  30 (M)

15

The problem of speech recognition 2

I §5 PowerPoint mp3 mp3

Q4

 

Oct 2(W)

16

Speech perception 1 - SineWaveSpeech, Original

I §6 PowerPoint mp3    

4 (F)

17

Speech perception 2

I §6 PowerPoint mp3    

7 (M)

18

Speech perception 3

I §6 PowerPoint --

Q5

 

9 (W)

19

Speech recognition lexicon

I §7 PowerPoint mp3  

Turn in timesheets

11 (F)

--

FALL BREAK

         

14 (M)

20
Disorders of auditory processing 1 I §8 PowerPoint mp3    

16 (W)

21
Disorders of auditory processing 2 I §8 PowerPoint mp3    

18 (F)

22
Lateralization of phonology 1   PowerPoint mp3    

21 (M)

23
Lateralization of phonology 2   PowerPoint mp3

Q6

 

23 (W)

24

Lateralization of phonology 3

  PowerPoint mp3    

25 (F)

25

Morphology & the mental lexicon

I §9 PowerPoint mp3    

28 (M)

26

Lexical semantics 1

I §10 PowerPoint mp3

Q7

 

30 (W)

27

Lexical semantics 2

I §10 PowerPoint mp3    

Nov 1 (F)

28

Lexical semantics 3

I §10 PowerPoint mp3    

4 (M)

29

Lexical semantics 4

I §10 PowerPoint mp3

Q8

 

6 (W)

30

Syntax 1/Sentence comprehension

I §12 PowerPoint mp3    

8 (F)

31

Syntax 2/Sentence comprehension

I §12 PowerPoint mp3    

11 (M)

32

Syntax 3/Sentence comprehension

I §12 PowerPoint mp3

Q9

 

13 (W)

33

Syntax 4/On-line processing

I §13 PowerPoint mp3    

15 (F)

34

Syntax 5/On-line processing

I §13 PowerPoint mp3    

18 (M)

35

Syntax 6/On-line processing

I §13 PowerPoint mp3

Q10

 

20 (W)

36

Syntax 7/On-line processing

I §14 PowerPoint mp3    

22 (F)

37

Syntax 8/On-line processing

I §14 PowerPoint mp3    

25 (M)

38
Syntax 9/On-line processing   PowerPoint  mp3    

27 (W)

--
THANKSGIVING BREAK          

29 (F)

--
THANKSGIVING BREAK          

Dec 3 (M)

39
Discourse      

Q11

 

5 (W)

40

Last day

        Turn in timesheets

13 (F)


FINAL EXAM day, 1-5.
Oral presentations.

samples:   guidelines: presentation



   

Go back to Harry Howard's home page

Current version 08/27/08; Last change 15-nov-13 .