Sociology 630: Urban Policy and Planning

Spring 2003. Wednesdays, 2:00-4:30.

200A Newcomb Hall

 

Professor: Kevin F. Gotham

Sociology: 220 Newcomb Hall

Phone: 862-3004

Office Hours: 4:00 - 5:00, Mondays and Fridays, all other times by appointment.

 

Course Description.

In this course, we will examine how urban polices and programs have affected cities and metropolitan in the United States and around the world over the last hundred years or so.  Specifically, we will cover six major topics: (1) the impact of race and class on uneven metropolitan development; (2) the connections between gentrification and urban revitalization; (3) the growth of security and surveillance in metropolitan America; (4) the increasing salience of consumption, spectacle, and simulation in the organization of cities; (5) the rise of urban branding and implications of redeveloping cities as entertainment centers; and (6) the role of heritage, culture, and place promotion in the growth of urban tourism.  Some of the questions we will address are: How have  governmental programs and policy making affected cities and metropolitan areas? Who controls the formulation and implementation of urban policy? What kinds of conflicts and struggles have historically affected public policy at the urban, regional, and national levels? How is urban policy embedded within larger socioeconomic processes, power structures, and global forces? What is the relationship between theory, research, and policy?

 

Required Prerequisites: Soc. 304 (Research Analysis) and 322 (Social Theory), or instructor approval.

 

Recommended Prerequisites: Soc. 206 (Urban Sociology), Soc. 303 (Introduction to Research Design). 

 

Required Reading:

Andranovich, Gregory D., and Gerry Riposa. 1993. Doing Urban Research. Volume 33 of Applied Social Research Methods Series. Sage Publications.

 

Chatterton, Paul and Robert Hollands. 2003. Urban Nightscapes: Youth Cultures, Pleasure Spaces, and Corporate Power. London and New York: Routledge . 

 

Gotham, Kevin Fox. 2002. Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development: The Kansas City Experience. Albany, NY: State University of New York (SUNY) Press.

 

Hoffman, Lily M., Susan S. Fainstein, and Dennis R. Judd (editors). 2003. Cities and Visitors: Regulating People, Markets, and City Space. New York: Blackwell.

Low, Setha. 2003. Behind the Gates: Life, Security, and the Pursuit of Happiness in Fortress America. New York: Routledge.

 

Ritzer, George. 2005. Enchanting a Disenchanted World: Revolutionizing the Means of Consumption. Second Edition. Pine Forge Press. 

 

Sociology Writing Group. 1998. A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers. Saint Martins Press. Paperback. 

 

Taylor, Monique M. 2002.  Harlem: Between Heaven and Hell. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press

 

Course Requirements

The course will follow a seminar format that combines lecture material and group discussion.  As I see them, seminars are primarily for intense analysis and discussion.  I see my role as coordinating and facilitating this process but I take as given the active and enthusiastic participation of all members of the group.  It is essential that each student complete the readings before each class session and come prepared to discuss the material.  All students are required to attend every class period unless they are ill or prevented from attending by exceptional circumstances.  Preparedness, attendance and participation are expected and will have a bearing on final grades.  Requirements for this course include an individual (or group) research project, an in-class presentation of the research project, a series of critical essays, and class attendance and participation.

 

Urban Research Project (40 percent of final grade).  You are to complete a major research project and paper that can include either an urban case study or service learning.  You choose which to pursue. 

 

Option #1: Urban Case Study: The Transformation of New Orleans (40 percent of final grade).  You will design and carry out a research project that has to do with the growth of tourism, leisure sites, arts and historical districts, and entertainment spectacles in New Orleans since 1980. Your goal is to document the role of private interests and government policy in the transformation of New Orleans while at the same time highlighting the interlocking nature of race, class, gender in the production of spaces of leisure, consumption, tourism, and entertainment.  You have your choice of four research topics:

 

1. Race, Gender, and Commercialization in Mardi Gras.  As New Orleans’s signature celebration, Mardi Gras has historically been a lightning rod of controversy over race, gender, and commercialization (or commodification).  In this research project, you will explore conflicts over race, gender, and commercialization in Mardi Gras since 1980.  Here you will focus on the racial and gender conflicts over efforts to pass an anti-discrimination ordinance in 1991, and local government attempts to designate official status to Mardi Gras in 1994 and 2004.  Answer the following questions:


                     Generally, how have race and gender conflicts shaped and influenced debates over the commercialization of Mardi Gras since 1980?  What does commercialization mean and how has it been framed in local debates over Mardi Gras?  What key actors, groups, and organized interests have supported the commercialization of Mardi Gras?  Which groups have opposed commercialization and why? 

                     What were the major bases of conflict and disagreement during the 1991-1992 debate over the anti-discrimination ordinance?  Identify groups that supported and opposed the ordinance and describe their major arguments.

                     Why has the city government attempted to designate “official” status to Mardi Gras?  What are the pros and cons?  Why have some individuals and groups opposed these government efforts?  What are the major differences between the 1994 effort to designate “official” status to Mardi Gras and the 2004 effort?

                     How do racial and gender conflicts over Mardi Gras connect to the major themes, topics,  processes, and trends discussed in the course readings?

 

2. The impact of the 1984 World’s Fair on New Orleans.  Some people have asserted that the 1984 Louisiana World Exposition in New Orleans was an important impetus to the redevelopment of the New Orleans riverfront and the conversion of land-uses adjacent to the French Quarter (and in the Warehouse District and other neighborhoods) from industrial to commercial use for tourism.  Sadly, little has been written to substantiate such claims.  You are to research the planning, organization, and effects of the 1984 World’s Fair on New Orleans.  Answer the following questions:

                     Who were the key actors organized interests responsible for planning the Exposition?  What kinds of social conflicts and group struggles affected the planning and staging of the Exposition?

                     What role did federal, state, and local governments (policies and programs) play in organizing and funding the Exposition? 

                     How was the Exposition a success?  What were the positive effects?  Were there any negative consequences? 

                     How exactly did the Exposition shape the future development of tourism in New Orleans? 

                     What major themes, topics, processes, or trends discussed in the course readings help understand and explain the planning, organization, and effects of the Exposition in New Orleans?

 

3. Casinos and the Rise of Gaming.  Recent decades have witnessed major changes in the production, organization, and financing of casinos.  You are to explain the causes and consequences of the rise of casinos, and the transformation of the gaming industry in New Orleans.  Answer the following questions:

                     Who have been the key actors and organized interests responsible for the development of gaming and the growth of casinos in New Orleans?

                     What have been the most important economic and political changes that have affected the gaming industry in the city and region?  

                     What role have federal, state, and local governments (policies and programs) played in the rise of casinos and the transformation of the gaming industry? 

                     How are local conflicts over casinos and gaming facilities (e.g., ethnic, racial, and class struggles) related to similar conflicts in other cities?

                     What major themes, topics, processes, or trends discussed in the course readings help understand and explain the proliferation of casinos and other gaming facilities in New Orleans?

 

4. Transformation of the New Orleans Hospitality/Tourism Industry.   In this research project, you are to examine the development of the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation, the New Orleans Multicultural Tourism Network, the Greater New Orleans Hotel and Lodging Association, Mayor's Office of Tourism and Arts, the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation, and the expansion of promotion efforts by the New Orleans Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau.  In the 1980s and 1990s, these institutions have become central forces in the expansion of the tourism industry and have played strategic roles in promoting the city to a global audience.  Answer the following questions:

                     What is the explicit purpose of these organizations?  How are they funded?  Do the organizations have any implicit goals or latent functions?  What are their shared agendas or overlapping goals?  How exactly do they accomplish their goals? How are the different organizations connected and networked? (Construct a diagram).

                     Are there any bureaucratic conflicts or turf battles between the organizations?  How have conflicts over hotel worker unionization and other labor struggles affected the development of tourism in New Orleans since 1980?  How are these conflicts and struggles related to race and gender? 

                     What role of have federal, state, and local governments (policies and programs) played in helping to foster and encourage that growth of these organizations?  What role has the private sector played? 

                     What are the promotional strategies these organizations have employed to construct and market New Orleans to attract tourists?  How have these organizations shaped the production, financing, and advertising of local festivals and celebrations?

                     What major themes, topics, processes, or trends discussed in the course readings help understand and explain the establishment and operation of the tourism organizations?

 

The final research paper must be at least 20 pages excluding the cover page, references, and tables and figures.  Papers are to be typed and double-spaced with one inch margins and page numbers in the top right hand corner.  Address your final paper to an audience composed of people who know nothing of the material you read, the concepts you use, and the data you have collected.

 

Do not delay in your choice of topic and starting your research.  The primary source of data for this research project will be newspaper articles from the Times-Picayune and other local newspapers.  You should consult the Times-Picayune Index (located in the newspaper section of the Howard Tilton Library in the basement) that lists every article the newspaper published from 1972-present.  The index is organized topically by subject keywords in alphabetical order.  Other articles can be obtained from Lexis-Nexis. You must attach all photocopied newspaper articles and data sources to your final paper.  Other data collection for the research project can be obtained from assigned course readings and the following library and documentary resources: local archives, scholarly journals, newspapers, magazines, congressional testimony, planning department documents, government reports and analyses, census bureau data, books, and other written documents. You should search for data at all available libraries, archives, internet web sites, and anywhere else you can find material.  You are to read and consult A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers for directions on using library resources, locating references and material, organizing information, and writing the research paper.  See pp. 63-72 in A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers for searching online information. 

 

You may not use interviews, surveys and questionnaires, focus groups, participant observation, or any other forms of original data collection that involve human subjects.  You may cite and refer to other researchers’ studies on human subjects (as secondary sources).  You must use the guidelines in chapter 4 of  A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers for acknowledging sources, and listing bibliographic references and citations.  Be sure to make appropriate reference citations to other authors’ work when quoting directly from them and when paraphrasing them, otherwise you run the risk of being charged with plagiarism.

 

All students are required to abide by the Tulane University Honor Code.  This means that “the presence of a student’s name on any work submitted in completion of an academic assignment is considered to be an assurance that the work and ideas are the result of the student’s own intellectual effort, stated in her or his own words, and produced independently, unless clear and explicit acknowledgment of the sources for the work and ideas is included.  This principle applies to papers, tests, homework assignments, artistic productions, laboratory reports, computer programs, and other assignments” (Tulane University Undergraduate Catalog 2003-2005, p. 16).

 

Sample Outline for Research Paper.  Your final paper should be divided up into the following six sections:

 

Introduction

Indicate clearly and briefly what the purpose of the research is.  Briefly identify the major issues or problems the paper addresses and the major sources of data used in the paper.  Very briefly and succinctly state the core findings of the paper and how the paper will be organized.  Do not report on every little detail and finding; be short, clear, and to the point.  This introduction section should be no more than three double-spaced pages.

 

Literature Review

Briefly summarize the current sociological research on the research topic you are studying. You should include other scholars’ empirical findings, concepts, and theories that link your study with existing scholarly research on the same topic.  Search for the current state of sociological research on your topic in the journals listed above. 

Sociological Analysis

Provide a general overview of your theoretical argument and then discuss the major findings of your research and data collection.  You should show how your findings support your theory and relate to findings of other researchers.   Refer to scholarly journals for examples on how to write your findings and implications.  This section can be sub-divided into separate units.

 

Conclusion

Discuss the implications of your research. How is your research and its findings relevant and important to urban sociology?  How does your research connect to the course readings?  Be very clear and specific.  

 

References

You must have at least 20 citations in your reference section.  Cites from textbooks, encyclopedia, or other non-scholarly sources do not count.

 

Time-Line

Provide a time-line of events and happenings using the Times-Picayune newspaper articles.  Generally, this time-line should begin in the 1970s and extend through the present.   Provide a short summary of each article that makes clear why the article is important.  This summary can include significant events, identification of key actors and organized interests, explanations of major policy developments.  Finally, attach all newspaper articles from the Times-Picayune to your paper.  You should have at least several dozen newspaper articles.

 

Methodological Appendix

Provide a description of how the research was done.  You should identify the types and sources of data collected.  You should draw upon written histories, archives, census materials, newspaper files, planning department documents, and any other sources you can locate.  You should include data in tables, graphs, and/or figures if you have large amounts of quantitative data.  Put each table, graph, or figure on a separate page with a descriptive title over it.  In the text of the research paper, refer to the table or figure by number and then explain it.  Consult Doing Urban Research by Andranovich and Riposa and A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers by the Sociology Writing Group for assistance in writing a methodological appendix.

 

Option #2: Service Learning Project.  For students who choose this option, you will be required to participate in a service learning project for a minimum of 20 hours and write a final paper based upon your experience.  You will spend 20 hours working at the New Orleans Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau.  The primary goal of these service learning projects is to link your community work and experience in the New Orleans community to the course material.  Service learning is also a way of illustrating the larger substantive elements to which the course pertains.  If you want, you can receive an additional one-credit by completing 35 service learning hours.  You can do this by enrolling in Soc. 389-02 (25788). 

 


There are three components to any service learning activity: service, personal insight, and academic knowledge.  The service component provides the context and content of the volunteering experience as you enter into the community to donate time and skills.  The personal experience of volunteering often forces you to learn about yourself, to question your own beliefs, values, prejudices, ways of viewing the world, and the like.  Academic learning occurs as you connect classroom learning with the real world, observing and participating in practitioners’ daily activities.  The service learning work will help reinforce the theoretical concepts and ideas introduced in the textbook and discussed in class through interactions with people in the New Orleans community. You will discover on your own the congruencies and discrepancies between theories and reality, and more important, learn to think sociologically. 

 

In addition to participating in 20 hours of service learning work, you are required to attend at least two 30-45 minute discussion sessions where you will discuss your service learning experience with others.  Finally, you are required to write a 20 page paper that links the course material - e.g., concepts, theories, and related academic knowledge about cities and urban life - with your service learning experience.  Below are my expectations for this paper.

 

Description

Describe your service learning site, including its official purpose, the clientele it serves, the structure of the program, the training and use of personnel, and your role as a volunteer.  When you are writing about your site, keep in mind the significant differences between comments that are descriptive (observations), comments that discuss your feelings about what you are describing (reactions), and comments that detail conclusions about what you saw (interpretations).  You should not spend a lot of time describing mundane or ongoing operations of the various small groups or their activities at the site, or what you did each time you visited the site.  Keep in mind that your description should provide information that will give the necessary context for the more important components of the paper: your analysis and reflection. 

 

Analysis

Provide a critical analysis of your service learning experience.  Discuss how the concepts from the readings are illustrated in your activities or in the group’s operations or the community’s organization.  Answer the following questions: What kinds of urban problems are being addressed by the community organization(s) you are involved with?  What impacts do you see the organization or agencies making on the New Orleans community?   Finally, and most important, which concepts and theories addressed in the readings and class help you to understand the group you are involved with?

 

Reflection   


Discuss what you learned from your service learning experience.  This may include discussions of emotional responses, contemplation of political implications, and reflections on your own personal views of how the service learning experience has caused you to think differently about cities and urban life. What impact is your service learning work having on you?  How does your service learning experience relate to your understanding of class readings, course concepts, and different theories of cities and urban life? How has your service experience affected your views of New Orleans?

 

Your paper should build upon your practical experiences at the service learning site and reflect your thoughtful engagement with the subject matter of urban sociology.  You should deliberately apply the sociological concepts and theories learned in the class to your description, analysis, and reflection.  The three parts - description, analysis, and reflection - should not be kept artificially separate, but should instead be interwoven as appropriate throughout your paper.  Grammar, organization, spelling, and clarity all count.

 

Final papers for both projecs will be graded on a scale of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, and D-. One letter grade will be deducted for each day the paper is late.  I will not accept any faxed papers or emailed papers.  You are required to hand in two copies of your paper.

 

2. Oral Presentations (20 percent of final grade).

All students are required to present their research during the last two weeks of the semester.   Students should prepare and rehearse their presentation to do it smoothly and not exceed the time limit.  Make your presentation using an outline or note cards; do not prewrite your whole presentation and then read it.   The purpose of the oral presentation is to show that you understand key concepts, definitions, main findings, and can effectively communicate your research to a group of peers. 

 

2a. Oral Presentation of the Research Project.  Here are suggestions for oral presentation of the research paper:

Introduction

(a) Indicate what your research topic is and why you chose it (why you felt it was interesting and important).

(b) Very briefly, state your main finding(s).

Method

(a) Describe how you did your research (if you relied on books and library references, indicate the most useful ones; if you consulted planning documents and government reports, indicate which ones; etc.).  Most important, identify which archives and archival holdings (primary materials) you accessed. 

(b) If you had preconceived expectations, opinions, or hypotheses about what you would find out, state what they were.

(c) Describe special problems or difficulties that hindered or limited your research. 

Findings

(a) Describe the most important thing(s) you found out or learned about your topic.

(b) Consider the use of charts, tables, illustrations, etc. to make your presentation findings more effective.

Discussion


(a) In what ways were you surprised by your findings, or did they confirm what you expected?

(b) Make connections between your research findings and the concepts, theories, and findings we have discussed in class.

(c) Identify any unanswered questions from your research that could be researched in the future.

For an effective presentation, you should prepare a one-page handout to be distributed to the class the day before your presentation.  It may contain an outline of your whole presentation or you can use it to communicate key concepts, findings, illustrations, and bibliographic references.  Do not ramble; be as succinct as possible.

 

2b. Oral Presentation of Service Learning Project.  The oral presentation should follow the organization of the paper outlined above.  Here are suggestions for oral presentation of the service learning project:

Description.

(a)  Indicate why you chose the service learning project (why you felt it was interesting and important).

(b) Describe the service learning site, including its official purpose, the clientele it serves, the structure of the program, the training and use of personnel, and your role as a volunteer. 

Analysis

(a) Discuss how the concepts from the readings are illustrated in your activities or in the organization’s operations.

(b) What kinds of urban problems are being addressed by the community organization you are involved with? What impacts do you see the organization making on the New Orleans community?  Finally, and most important, which concepts and theories addressed in the readings and class help you to understand the group you are involved with?

Reflection   

(a) Discuss what you learned from your service learning experience.  This may include discussions of emotional responses, contemplation of political implications, and reflections on your own personal views of how the service learning experience has caused you to think differently about cities and urban life.

(b) What impact is your service learning work having on you?  How does your service learning experience relate to your understanding of class readings, course concepts, and different theories of cities and urban life? How has your service experience affected your views of New Orleans?

For an effective presentation, you should prepare a one-page handout to be distributed to the class the day before your presentation.  It may contain an outline of your whole presentation or you can use it to communicate key concepts, findings, illustrations, and bibliographic references. Do not ramble; be as succinct as possible.

 

3. Critical Essays (30 percent of final grade).


Critical Essays are short papers (about 1.5 single-spaced pages to three single-spaced pages) that convey your thoughts about and reactions to a particular reading assignment.  You are required to write seven critical essays on the assigned reading during the semester.  Everyone is required to write critical essay #1.  The class will be organized into four groups of 5-6 people.  The membership of these groups will be in  alphabetical order and will remain the same throughout the semester.  Each critical essay must be posted to the Blackboard “Discussion Board” for the course at least 24 hours before class (1:30 on Tuesday). The critical essays will be graded on a scale of A, B, C, and D. One letter grade will be deducted for each day the essay is late.  Each student should read all essays posted to the Discussion Board and come to class ready to discuss.  Critical Essays should accomplish the following two goals:

1. Reflect your thoughtful engagement with and consideration of the reading assignment.

2. Include questions or issues that you would like to have the class discuss.

Here are questions to guide your thinking about the reading and completing the critical essays:

What are the central arguments in the reading?

What data sources and/or concepts does the author use to support the argument?

What other lines of reasoning or thinking occur to you as a result of reading this selection?  What is it about the chapters that interest you?

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the book chapters?  If you were studying this issue, what would you have done similarly or differently?

See pp. 73-77 in A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers for directions on writing a critical essay.

As you write your critical essay, you should select one or two concepts/issues/themes/problems/ questions to orient your essay.  It is tempting to try to deal with all the points raised in the readings, but this will generally lead to a paper that sets too broad of an agenda.  Remember this assignment calls for only 1.5 - 3 single-spaced pages.  The essay (not an outline) should reflect your thoughtful engagement with the issues you chose.  It may take the form of an analysis of what is at stake in the debates or it may entail comments/critiques of specific arguments in the readings.

 

On specified days, each group will lead the class in discussion of the readings.  For example, Group #1 will lead the class discussion on February 2 and February 16; Group #2 on March 9 and March 16; Group #3 on February 23 and March 2; and Group #4 on March 30 and April 6.

 

All participants in the course have a responsibility to do the readings for the week, to listen to what is being said by other participants (rather than being overly preoccupied with what you are going to say), and not to interrupt people in the middle of sentences.  We hope to create a setting in which everyone feels comfortable talking, even if they do not have something “brilliant” or “profound” to say.  Sometimes the most simple questions can lead to the most fruitful discussions.

 

4. Class Attendance and Participation (10 percent of final grade).

Ten percent of your grade will be based on my evaluation of your participation in class. Class participation includes sharing thoughts and ideas, observations, assessments, and questions during class time. Thoughtful participation means regularly attending class and being prepared to discuss the assigned subject matter.  To encourage class participation and the sharing of ideas, you should identify one or two questions from the assigned readings that you would like to discuss in class. You should always ask yourself how the assigned reading for the day can help you with your own research project.

 

Course Grades:

Research Project                                  40% of final grade.

Oral Presentation                                  20% of final grade.

Critical Essays                          30% of final grade.

Class Attendance and Participation       10% of final grade.

 

I do not give extra credit, extra assignments, nor other opportunities for improving grades.  Moreover, I do not negotiate about grades, except when you believe there is an explicit error in the grading procedures.  No grades will be determined by a curve.  Also, I do not like the informal and impersonal nature of email.  You may not ask me questions about the course over email (or by phone).  If you have questions, please make an appointment and come talk with me.

 

 

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

 

Week 1: Introduction. January 12 (Wednesday).

Required Reading:


 

                     Gregory D. Andranovich and Gerry Riposa. 1993. Doing Urban Research. (Read entire book).

 

                     Sociology Writing Group. 1998. A Guide to Writing Sociology Papers. (Read entire book).

 

Weeks 2-3: Race, Class, and Uneven Development (January 19 and 26)

Required Reading for January 19

                     chapters 1-4 in Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development by Prof. Gotham

 

Required Reading for January 26

                     Chapters 5-6 and the conclusion in Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development.

 

                     “Missed Opportunities, Enduring Legacies: School Segregation and Desegregation in Kansas City, Missouri.” American Studies. 43: 2 (Summer 2002): 5-42.  (On electronic reserve). 

 

                     Squires, Gregory. 2003. “Racial Profiling, Insurance Style: Insurance Redlining and the Uneven Development of Metropolitan Areas.” Journal of Urban Affairs. 25(4): 391-410. (On electronic reserve). 

 

                     Critical Essay #1 due.  Essay due from everyone (Groups 1-4). 

 

General Recommended Reading:

                     Bullard, Robert D. J. Eugene Grigsby, and Charles Lee (editors). 1994. Residential Apartheid: The American Legacy. Los Angeles, CA: The Regents of the University of California. Center for Afro-American Studies (CAAS) Publication.

 

                     Dreier, Peter, John Mollenkopf, and Todd Swanstrom. 2001. Place Matters: Metropolitics for the Twenty-First Century. University of Kansas Press.

 

                     McKenzie, Evan. 1994. Privatopia: Homeowner Associations and the Rise of Residential Private Government. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

 

                     Massey, Douglas S., and Nancy A. Denton. 1993. American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

 

                     Wilson, William Julius. 1987. The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

 

                     Wilson, William Julius. 1996. When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

 

                     Weiss, Marc A. 1987. Rise of the Community Builders: The American Real Estate Industry and Urban Land Planning. New York: Columbia University Press.

 

 

Week 4-5: Gentrification and Urban Revitalization (February 2 and 9)

Required Reading for February 2.

                     Taylor, Monique M. 2002.  Harlem: Between Heaven and Hell. (read entire book).

 

                     Critical Essay #2 due.  Essay due from Groups 1, 2, and 3.  Group #1 leads class discussion. 

 

General Recommended Reading

                     Special issue of Urban Studies on Gentrification. Atkinson, Rowland. 2003. “Introduction: Misunderstood Saviour or Vengeful Wrecker: The Many Meanings and Problems of Gentrification.” Urban Studies. 40 (12): 2343-50. November 2003.

 

                     Carpenter, Juliet, and Loretta Lees. 1995. “Gentrification in New York, London, and Paris: An International Comparison.” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research.  19(2): 286-303.

 

                     Gotham, Kevin Fox. 2005. “Tourism Gentrification: The Case of New Orleans’s Vieux Carre (French Quarter).” Forthcoming in Urban Studies.

 

                     Brenner, Neil and Nik Theodore (editor). 2002. Spaces of Neoliberalism: Urban Restructuring in North America and Western Europe.  New York: Blackwell. 

 

                     Smith, Neil. 1996. The New Urban Frontier: Gentrification and the Revanchist City. New York: Routledge. 

 

                     Elvin K. Wyly and Daniel J. Hammel. “Gentrification, Housing Policy, and the New Context for Redevelopment, “ in Kevin Fox Gotham (editor). Critical Perspectives on Urban Redevelopment. Elsevier Press. 

 

                     Zukin, Sharon. 1991. “Gentrification, Cuisine, and the Critical Infrastructure.” In Landscapes of Power: From Detroit to Disneyworld, pp. 179-215. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

 

 

Week 6-7:  Security and Surveillance in Metropolitan America (February 16 and 23)

Required Reading for February 16

                     Chapters 1-5 in Low, Setha. 2003. Behind the Gates: Life, Security, and the Pursuit of Happiness in Fortress America.

 

                     Critical Essay #3 due.  Essay due from Groups 1, 2, and 4. Group 1 leads class discussion.

 

Required Reading for February 23

                     Chapters 5-11 in Low, Setha. 2003. Behind the Gates: Life, Security, and the Pursuit of Happiness in Fortress America.

 

                     Critical Essay #4 due.  Essay due from Groups 1, 3, and  4.  Group 3 leads class discussion

 

General Recommended Reading

                     Marcuse, Peter, and R. Van Kempen (editors). 2002. Of States and Cities: The Partitioning of Urban Space. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

                     Davis, Mike. 1990. City of Quartz. New York, NY: Vintage Books.

 

 

Weeks 8-9 : Consumption, Spectacle, and Simulation (March 2 and 9)

Required Reading for March 2

                     Chapters 1-4 in Ritzer, George. Enchanting a Disenchanted World: Revolutionizing the Means of Consumption. Second Edition.

 

                     Critical Essay #5 due.  Essay due from Groups 2, 3, 4.  Group 3 leads class discussion. 

 

Required Reading for March 9

                     Chapters 5-8 in Ritzer, George. Enchanting a Disenchanted World: Revolutionizing the Means of Consumption. Second Edition.

 

                     Critical Essay #6 due.  Essay due from Groups 1, 2, and 3.  Group 2 leads class discussion.

 

General Recommended Reading

                     Special issue of Urban Studies on Urban Consumption.  Miles, Steven and Roman Paddison. 1998. “Urban Consumption: A Historiographical Note.” Urban Studies. 35(5/6): 815-824.

 

                     Bryman, Alan. 1999. “Disneyization of Society.” Sociological Review.  47(1): 25-47. Feb. 1999.

 

                     Eeckhout, Bart. 2001. “The ‘Disneyification’ of Times Square: Back to the Future?” in Kevin Fox Gotham (editor). Critical Perspectives on Urban Redevelopment. Elsevier Press.

 

                     Gottdiener, Mark (editor). 2000. New Forms of Consumption: Consumers, Culture, and Commodification. Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

 

                     Ritzer, George. 2004.  The Globalization of Nothing. Pine Forge Press.

 

 

Weeks 10-11. Cities are Fun: Entertainment, Pleasure Spaces, and Urban Branding (March 16 and 30)

Required Reading for March 16.

                     Chapters 1-4 in Chatterton and Hollands. Urban Nightscapes: Youth Cultures, Pleasure Spaces, and Corporate Power.

 

                     Critical Essay #7 due.  Essays due from Groups 1, 2, and 4.  Group 2 leads class discussion. 

 

                     Video: “Merchants of Cool.”

 

March 23. Spring Break. No Class

 

Required Reading for March 30

                     Chapters 5-10 in Chatterton and Hollands. Urban Nightscapes: Youth Cultures, Pleasure Spaces, and Corporate Power.

 

                     No Critical Essay.

 

General Recommended Reading

                     Hannigan, John. 1998. Fantasy City: Pleasure and Profit in the Postmodern Metropolis. New York: Routledge.

 

                     Harvey, David. 1989. The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry into the Origins of Cultural Change. Blackwell.

 

                     Kearns, Gerry, and Chris Philo. 1993. Selling Places: The City as Cultural Capital, Past and Present. Oxford: Pergamon Press.

 

                     Symposium on Branding, the Entertainment Economy and Urban Place Building in the  International Journal of Urban and Regional Research. June 2003. 27(2).  Introduction by John Hannigan with articles from Robert Hollands and Paul Chatterton, Miriam Greenberg, and Graeme Evans.

 

 

Weeks 12-13: Critical Perspectives on Urban Tourism: Heritage, Culture, and Place Promotion (April 6 and 13).

Required Reading for April 6

                     Introduction and Chapters 1-7 in Hoffman, Lily M., Susan S. Fainstein, and Dennis R. Judd (editors). 2003. Cities and Visitors: Regulating People, Markets, and City Space

 

                     Critical Essay #8 due.  Essays due from Groups 1, 3, and 4.  Group 4 leads class discussion.

 

Required Reading for April 13.

                     Chapters 8-13 in Hoffman, Lily M., Susan S. Fainstein, and Dennis R. Judd (editors). 2003. Cities and Visitors: Regulating People, Markets, and City Space

 

                     Critical Essay #9.  Essay due from Groups 2, 3, and 4.  Group 4 leads class discussion. 

 

General Recommended Reading

                     Alsayyad, Nezar (editor). 2001. Consuming Tradition, Manufacturing Heritage: Global Norms and Urban Forms in the Age of Tourism. London: Routledge.

 

                     Boyd, Michelle. 2000. “Reconstructing Bronzeville: Racial Nostalgia and Neighborhood Redevelopment.” Journal of Urban Affairs. 22(2): 107-122.  

 

                     Bures, Regina M. 2001. “Historic Preservation, Gentrification, and Tourism: The Transformation of Charleston, South Carolina,” in Kevin Fox Gotham (editor). Critical Perspectives on Urban Redevelopment. Elsevier Press.

 

                     Clark, Terry Nichols Clark and Richard Lloyd. 2001. “The City as an Entertainment Machine,” in Kevin Fox Gotham (editor). Critical Perspectives on Urban Redevelopment. Elsevier Press. 

 

                     Gotham, Kevin Fox. 2002. “Marketing Mardi Gras: Commodification, Spectacle, and the Political Economy of Tourism in New Orleans.” Urban Studies. 39(10): 1735-56. September 2002.

 

                     Judd , Dennis R. (editor). 2003. The Infrastructure of Play: Building the Tourist City. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe.

 

                     Judd, Dennis R., and Susan S. Fainstein (editors). 1999. The Tourist City. New Haven: Yale University Press.

 

                     Rath, Jan (editor). 2005. Tourism, Ethnic Diversity and the City.  Routledge.

 

                     Shellner, Mimi and John Urry (editors). 2004. Tourism Mobilities: Places to Play, Places in Play. Routledge.

 

                     Urry, John 2002. Tourist Gaze. Second Edition. Sage Publications, London.  

 

                     Zukin, Sharon. 1995. The Cultures of Cities. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell.

 

 

Weeks 14-15. Research Presentations. April 20 and 27.