SPRING 1998 PROGRAMS

Newcomb College Center for Research on Women is a member of the Tulane Coalition for Cultural Enhancement


JANUARY||FEBRUARY||MARCH||APRIL


Unless otherwise noted, all programs will take place in the Anna E. Many Lounge, Newcomb College Center for Research on Women, Caroline Richardson Hall, Tulane University. Please call (504) 865-5238 for more information. For those unfamilar with Tulane, here is a map to help you find us.





WOMEN OF THE YELLOW EARTH (video)
4 & 7 p.m., Thursday 22 January
Tradition, state and family collide in this BBC documentary that introduces audience to two contemporary rural Chinese women. Bai has just given birth to her third child - a daughter - and is trouble with the family planning authorities. Ma Ning is about to be married in a deal brokered by a matchmaker.


ALSO OF POSSIBLE INTEREST...
Planned Parenthood of Louisiana Candlelight Vigil to Commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Roe v. Wade Decision
Thursday 22 January 4:00 p.m.-ish Audubon Park
Before the vigil, there will be a 4:30-5:30 p.m. program featuring doctors and lawyers who were part of the pro-choice movement in this country 25 years ago.


TULANE UNIVERSITY FEMINISTS
8:30 p.m., Monday 26, January



OCTAVIA BUTLER READING GROUP (Organizational Meeting)
4 p.m., Tuesday 27 January
Newcomb College Center for Research on Women is sponsoring a reading group devoted to reading and discussion of the works of renowned African American feminist science fiction writer Octavia Butler. Butler will visit the university November 1-6, 1998 as the Fourteenth Annual Zale Writer-in-Residence. This reading group is open to students, faculty, staff and community members. Regular meeting times convenient to group members will be worked out at this meeting.


WOMEN AND THE DEATH PENALTY An Open Forum
4 p.m., Tuesday 29 January
Should Texas execute Karla Faye Tucker?
Karla Faye Tucker is scheduled to be executed for the pick axe murders of a man and a woman fourteen years ago. Although executions have become almost routine in the state of Texas, Tucker's case has drawn national attention. Why? Because only one woman has been executed in the United States since the resumption of capital punishment in 1976? Because Texas has not executed a woman in over one hundred years?


CANCELLED 1/29/98 by International Institute for Learning due to a lack of response in the New Orleans area
WOMEN'S MILLENNIUM: CHANGING THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS
Noon-4 pm, Wednesday 4 February
117 Richardson Memorial Hall
In cooperation with the International Institute for Learning, Inc., Newcomb College Center for Research on Women is facilitating Tulane University's participation as a supersite host of this interactive teleconference featuring business innovation expert and best-selling author Tom Peters, acclaimed television journalist and producer Linda Ellerbee, best-selling author and educator Stephanie Coontz, gender communications specialist and author Dr. Pat Heim, Editor-in-chief of Working Mother magazine Judith Culbreth, author and CEO Heather Shea, and a celebrated panel of experts, honorees and attendees from the "25 Most Influential Working Mothers" conference.
Individual tickets are $195
For more extensive information, visit the teleconference website: http://www.iil.com/womenmill.html
To register for the videoconference, phone 1-800-325-1533


STILL KILLING US SOFTLY and SLIM HOPES (videos)
4 and 7 pm, Thursday 5 February
A public screening and discussion of Jean Kilbourne's classic docu-lectures about images of women in advertising and the relationships of those images to women's self-image.


MEET THE ARTIST: A BROWN BAG LUNCH WITH JOAN WOODBURY
Artist-in-Residence, Newcomb Dance Program Tulane Department of Theater and Dance
and
Alice Pascal-Escher, Associate Professor of Theater and Dance, Tulane University
Noon, Friday 6 February
During this lunchtime event, Alice Pascal-Escher will direct an informal discussion with Joan Woodbury about Woodbury's life and career in the dance world. Co-founder of Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, Joan Woodbury is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and studied at the Freie Universitate in Berlin where she was a Fullbright Scholar in dance with Mary Wigman. She has been a professor of modern dance at the University of Utah since 1951, has taught workshops and master classes and performed extensively in the United States and around the world.


THEORIZING AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S RHETORIC: THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SPHERES OF EXPERIENCE
A lecture by Dr. Olga Idriss Davis, Assistant Professor of Speech Communication at Kansas State University
4:30 pm, Friday 6 February
This lecture is co-sponsored by the Tulane Departments of Communication and African Diaspora Studies and Newcomb College Center for Research on Women. It is supported by a grant from the Newcomb Foundation.


TULANE N.O.W. MEETING
6 pm, Sunday 9 February
Join us as we discuss upcoming events and issues concerning women's rights on campus and in the community


BELL HOOKS: CULTURAL CRITICISM & TRANSFORMATION (video)
4 pm and 7 pm, Thursday 12 February
In this video produced by the Media Education Foundation, bell hooks, Distinguished Professor of English at City College of New York and one of America's most accessible public intellectuals, talks about the theoretical foundations that inform her work and demonstrates through concrete analysis of a selection of popular texts the value of cultural studies. (66 minutes/1997)


A TALK BY WRITER PEARL CLEAGE
7:00 p.m., Monday 16 February, Kendall Cram Room, University Union
Pearl Cleage is an award-winning playwright, author and performing artist. She is artistic director of Just US Theater Company, editor Catalyst magazine, a regular columnist for the Atlanta Tribune, playwright- in-residence at Atlanta's Spelman College and a contributing editor to Ms. magazine.

Pearl Cleage's address is part of the the 1998 Black Arts Festival schedule of activities. The festiva is sponsored and coordinated by the African American Congress of Tulane (ACT).


OCTAVIA BUTLER READING GROUP MEETING
5:30 p.m., Tuesday 17 February, Anna E. Many Lounge
The reading is the novel Dawn, the first book in Butler's Xenogenesis series.


CULINARY HISTORY GROUP FILM
"Anatomy of A Springroll" A film written and directed by Paul Kwan and Arnold Iger
4 and 7 p.m. (Discussion to follow 7 p.m. screening), Tuesday 17 February
"Food is everyone's first language," says Paul Kwan, the Vietnamese-born immigrant who fashioned this film out of the rich sensory experience of childhood. He tells his way of finding a new life in America while maintaining his cultural connection through cooking, eating and sharing the rich and varied food of his native land. Humorous, stylish, and visually savory, this film about food, longing and memory bends the documentary form in novel directions. (56 minutes/1995)


LOUISIANA WOMEN'S STUDIES CONSORTIUM MEETING/POTLUCK BRUNCH
11 a.m., Saturday 28 February, Anna E. Many Lounge
The Topic: STRATEGIES FOR ACADEMIC SURVIVAL

What should They have told you in grad school about how academia really works--especially for women? What have you figured out through astute observation or creative connivance? How do we star in job interviews, boast about ourselves, chat up powerful people, get fabulous raises, revolutionize the world for women, and otherwise improve our prospects without selling our souls too much?

Bring food, beverages, ideas, and ancedotes: what works, what doesn't, role models, cautionary tales, and secret solutions.

RSVP: Baton Rouge, Emily Toth, LSU (504-388-3152) or e-mail: etoth@UNIX1.sncc.lsu.edu


CANCELLATION: Due to a death in Phyllis Chesler's family, the Salzer lecture has been cancelled (2/26/98). As of 4/8/98, the lecture has been re-scheduled for Sunday 27 September 1998 @ 3 p.m. in the Freeman Auditorium of the Woldenberg Art Center. Please re-visit this site or phone (504) 865-5238 for updates.
THE FIFTH ANNUAL ADELE RAMOS SALZER LECTURE ON WOMEN AND HIGHER EDUCATION:
"'I'M NOT A FEMINIST, BUT...': PASSING ON THE FEMINIST LEGACY AND THE LANGUAGE OF RESISTANCE TO TODAY'S YOUNG WOMEN"
A lecture by Phyllis Chesler
3 pm, Sunday 1 March
Freeman Auditorium
Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb College
Acclaimed psychologist and feminist Phyllis Chesler is a professor of psychology, sociology, anthropology and women's studies currently teaching at CUNY's College of Staten Island and at Brandeis University. She is author of seven books, including the women's studies classic Women and Madness (recently brought out in a new edition by Four Walls Eight Windows Press). Her latest work is Letters to a Young Feminist.
A reception and book-signing will follow Dr. Chesler's talk.



Screening and meet-the-filmaker:
A REASON TO BELIEVE
A film by Douglas Tirola

7 p.m.., Wednesday 4 March
117 Richardson Buiding -- Computer Building
(The one next to Gibson Hall)


Excerpt from the October 1995 review of the film in Elle:
"In _A Reason to Believe_, twenty-seven-year-old Douglas Tirola exhibits a political astuteness we don't often see in college movies. This issue drama unfolds around date rape. A vivacious blonde member of the scholl social set (Allison Smith) is forbidden by her jock boyfriend (Danny Quinn) to attend a toga blowout while he's away for the weekend, but her girlfriends egg her on. She can't resist and parties until one of the guys (Jay Underwood) forces himself on her in an empty bedroom.

This could be tiresomely trendy material, but Tirola's movie is a multisided examination of the ways in which women are treated by men -- and by other women. It's also about the uses that are made of other people's misfortunes. A political diva (Katharine Hepburn-esque Georgia Emelin) fastens on this event to further her own agenda. Tirola satirized everyone, yet he isn't condescending to the jock crowd or to the politically correct factions, either.

He does make hay with the dean (Mark Metcalf), who presides over meetings between the students with a beam-me-to-the-golf-course look on his self-satisfied face. Metcalf appeared as Neidermeyer in the 1978 frat-basher _National Lampoon's Animal House_; his wryly adept perfomance here is a joke about how far our educational system has evolved in the years between that movie and this one. Neidermeyer has now become the dean.

Early on, we watch toga-wearing jocks make their way to the party. They've turned their excursion into a ritualistic parade. Suddenly, they're met by a group of placard-waving liberal classmates. Tirola sets the ensuing fight to music (the soundtrack includes songs by Blind Melon, X and Material Issue) and films it as though it's a political mosh pit. It's a disturbingly witty scene. Tirola is saying that the lives of young Americans are always on the verge of becoming an MTV clip. That's not so far-fetched."

In addition, the film received rave reviews from the New York Times and ABC Radio, as well as from greek affairs and women's groups on a range of campuses across the nation.



WHAT'S WRONG WITH PRO-LIFE FEMINISM
4 p.m., Tuesday 10 March
A Women's Studies Faculty Associate Work-in-Progress talk by
David Boonin-Vail, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Tulane University



ETHNOLOGIE FEMININE: AUTOBIOGRAPHY, IDENTITY AND GLOBAL CULTURE
A interdisciplinary colloquium co-sponsored by the Tulane Departments of French and Italian, Anthropology, African Diaspora Studies, English and by Newcomb College Center for Research on Women.

VISIT THE COLLOQUIUM WEBSITE FOR THE LATEST INFORMATION & THE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS



"BORN FEMALE AND CHINESE"
A lecture by Grace Lee Boggs

7 p.m., Tuesday 17 March
Grace Lee Boggs is a first-generation Chinese American who has been a speaker, writer and movement activist in the African American Community for fifty-five years. Educated at Barnard and Bryn Mawr (where, in 1940, she earned a Ph.D. in Philosophy), Boggs was in her twenties when she became involved in radical politics and was inspired to become a revolutionary focusing on the black community. Her political autobiography, Living for Change has just been published by University of Minnesota Press. Dr. Boggs lives as a community activist in Detroit.

A reception and book-signing will follow Dr. Boggs' talk.

Dr. Boggs' visit to New Orleans is co-sponsored with the University of New Orleans Women's Center and the Loyola University Women's Center, and is supported in part by a generous grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities



"INTERCULTURAL DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIP"
A Women's Studies Program Director Candidate talk
by Jill Bystyzienski,
Professor of Sociology and
Director of Women's Studies, Franklin College

4 p.m., Thursday 19 March
Anna E. Many Lounge



"IT'S A GIRL! -- THE STORY OF 'FEMININE PRODUCTS' FROM CONCEPTION TO BIRTH"
A video and roundtable discussion by Michele DuBos, Koki Otero and Mary Kosut the producers of "Feminine Products -- no strings attached," the critically acclaimed and controversial women's art exhibit that ran in Fall 1997 at New Orleans' Zeitgeist Theater Experiments space.
7:00 pm, Thursday 19 March
In addition to the world-debut of the video documentary about the show, DuBos, Otero and Kosut will recount the challenge of allowing women freedom of expression in a conservative, male-dominated art world, the nine months of hard labor involved in producing the show, and the post- opening backlash against the show. Don't miss the chance to see the UR4SX Pill, the Titillator, and many other "feminine products" you'll never find at the drugstore. Visit the Feminine Products website, now hosted by the Center. Select pieces from the show will be on exhibit during March throughout Caroline Richardson Hall.



"FEMINIST IMPLICATIONS OF THE SILVER SCREEN JANE AUSTEN"
A Women's Studies Program Director Candidate talk
by Devoney Looser,
Assistant Professor of English and
Acting Director of Women's Studies,
Indiana State University

4 p.m., Monday 23 March
Anna E. Many Lounge



AN EVENING WITH SUSIE BRIGHT:
Safe Sex for Sex Maniacs

7 p.m., Monday 23 March, Dixon Hall
You don't know who Susie Bright is? A visit to her elaborate website -- www.susiebright.com -- will remedy that.

Bright's visit to Tulane is co-sponsored with the Lyceum Committee of Tulane University Campus Programming Board, and is made possible in part by a fund established at Newcomb College Center for Research on Women with a portion of the proceeds of the 1996 New Orleans Revlon Run/Walk for Women's Health.

During her visit, Ms. Bright will also meet in a closed, all-woman workshop session with a group of Newcomb students involved in a campus project to promote women's sexual/emotional health and well-being.



"BRITISH AND AMERICAN CULTURAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL INFLUENCES: A Comparative Analysis of Women's Militiant Social Movement Activism"
A Women's Studies Program Director Candidate talk
by Barbara Ryan,
Associate Professor of Sociology, Widener University

4 p.m., Thursday 26 March
Anna E. Many Lounge



NAKED ACTS (1997/87 minutes)

A screening and discussion with director Bridgett Davis
Friday 27 March, 7 p.m.
Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb College

This visually powerful film combines wit, drama and memorable characters to explore a young woman's journey towards accepting the body she one despised.

Cicely, who just lost 57 pounds, has been cast in her first film role. But her director/boyfriend has failed to mention that her part includes a nude scene. Cicely tries desperately to keep both her role and her clothes. It doesn't work, and by the film's hauntingly emotional climax, Cicely must reveal a secret that she once hid safely amidst her physical girth -- a revelation that explains why emotional nakedness is far more challenging than nudity could ever be.

Bridgett Davis is Associate Professor of English at Baruch College, City University of New York, where she teaches interdisciplinary courses in film writing, fiction and journalism. She wrote, produced and directed _Naked Acts_, slated for a specialized theatrical release in March 1998. When it is released, Davis will be the first African American woman to nationally self-distribute a film.

This screening and director's talk is sponsored by the African American Congress of Tulane as part of the Black Arts Festival, by the Tulane Office of Multicultural Affairs, and by Newcomb College Center for Research on Women


"OUR BODIES, OURSELVES: TAKING CONTROL OF YOUR OWN WELL-BEING"
A lecture by Judy Norsigian
3:00 pm. Sunday 29 March
Freeman Auditorium
Woldenberg Art Center
Co-founder Judy Norsigian, and other members of the Boston Women's Health Book Collective, revolutionized the way we look at women's health with the landmark publication of Our Bodies, Ourselves over two decades ago. Selling more than 3 million copies to date, the book continues to influence women and the health-care debate in America and worldwide. In "the definintive lecture on women's health issues," Norsigian encourages women to challenge the health-care establishment and take charge of our own well-being.

As co-author of Our Bodies, Ourselves and Our Bodies, Our Selves for the New Century (May 1998), Judy Norsigian speaks and writes frequently on a wide range of women's health concerns, and has appeared on numerous national television and radio programs, including Oprah and the NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw.

Norsigian served on the Board of the National Women's Health Network for 14 years and continues to remain active in this national membership organization. Ms. Norsigian is a current board member and past president of the Women's Statewide Legislative Network of Massachusetts; a board member of Community Works, Boston's alternative fund for social change organizations; a member of the Advisory Council of the Bureau of Family and Community Health, the Advisory Group on Nurse-Midwifery Education and Practice, and the Tobacco Control Oversight Council, all at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health; a member of the editorial/advisory boards of the journals Women and Health, Reproductive Health, and Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care; a member of the Technical Advisory Committee of the Contraceptive Research and Development Program; a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Applications of Biotechnology to Contraceptive Research and Development; and a member of the steering committee of the Committee on Women, Population and the Environment.

She has been honored with a Public Service Award from the Massachusetts Public Health Association (1989); as Doctor of Humane Letters, Honoris Causa, from Worcester State College (1994); and with the Radcliffe College Alumnae Association Annual Recognition Award (1995). In 1996, she was inducted into the Boston YWCA's Academy of Women Achievers.

Currently, Norsigian's work focuses on women and national health care reform, reproductive health (especially contraceptive research), tobacco and women, and midwifery advocacy.

This lecture is made possible by a fund established at Newcomb College Center for Research on Women with a portion of the proceeds of the 1996 New Orleans Revlon Run/Walk for Women's Health.


A HEALTHY BABY GIRL (1996/57 minutes)
and I NEED YOUR FULL COOPERATION (1989/28 minutes)

Wednesday 1 April, 7 p.m.

A HEALTHY BABY GIRL: In 1963 filmmaker Judith Hefland's mother was prescribed the synthetic hormone diethylstilbestrol (DES), meant to prevent miscarriage and insure a happy baby. For more than 30 years pharmaceutical companies sold DES to millions of pregnant women in the United States, even though they knew that the drug was ineffective and carcinogenic. At 25, Judith was diagnosed with a rare form of DES-related cervical cancer. She went home to her family to heal from a radical hysterectomy and picked up her camera. Shot over five years, the result, "A Healthy Baby Girl," is an intimate, humorous and searing exploration of what happens when science, marketing and corporate power come together with our deepest desires to reproduce ourselves. It is a must-see for anyone interested in the relationship between women's health, public policy, medical ethics and corporate responsibility.

I NEED YOUR FULL COOPERATION: This fascinating video by Kathy High uses experimental techniques to chronicle the relationship between women and institution of medicine. Barbara Ehrenreich and Carroll Smith-Rosenberg provide critical commentary, which High weaves around archival footage from Hollywood and educational films, and a take on Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper.

This screening is made possible by a fund established at Newcomb College Center for Research on Women with a portion of the proceeds of the 1996 New Orleans Revlon Run/Walk for Women's Health.


RIOTS AND GENDER IN NEW YORK CITY AND RICHMOND, VIRGINIA, IN THE ANTEBELLUM ERA
A lecture by Julie Curry, Ph.D. Candidate in History and Newcomb College Center for Research on Women Visiting Scholar
Tuesday 14 April, 4 p.m.


POSTPONED *AGAIN* DUE TO A MAJOR SCHEDULING CONFLICT! ALL APOLOGIES!
GIRLS, GRRRLS, GRRLS (and SPICE GIRLS): The Pop-Political Aesthetics of Revolution Girl Style Now
4 p.m. Thursday 16 April
A slide talk by Crystal Kile, Education Coordinator, Newcomb College Center for Research on Women



TOWARDS 2000: GENDER AND RACE IN THE NEXT CENTURY
A Two-Day Colloquium at Tulane University, Organized by the Louisiana Women's Studies Consortium
Saturday 18 April - Sunday 19 April
For a full schedule of events


THE CURRENT SITUATION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS IN BURMA
(more specific topic to be announced closer to the date of the talk)
A talk by Ohmar Khin, Burmese-in-exile and Human Rights Activist
7:00 pm, Monday 20 April
Ohmar Khin was a student leader during the 1988 democracy demonstrations in Burma, and was forced to flee her country after Burma's military regime massacred thousands of unarmed demonstrators. She is now living in the United States and works as a research associate with Refugees International and the Open Society Institute. She has co-authored a report on refugee trauma for the Harvard School of Public Health, and has personally interviewed many Burmese women who have been forced into the sex trade in Thailand. To learn more about ongoing Burmese political/freedom struggles, visit the website of FreeBurma.org, an infosite endorsed by Khin.


The Guy and Maude Alchon Forum at Tulane University presents
A FORUM ON SEXUAL HARRASSMENT WITH GUEST SPEAKER ANITA HILL
7-9 p.m. Tuesday April 21
McAlister Auditorium
Graduate Student Panel:

Michael Bibler
Elizabeth Cralley
Yolanda Dillion
Susan R Nanes
Nathalie Simon
Elizabeth A Smith

Reception from 5:30-6:30PM in the Kendall Kram Room at the University Center Book signing after the event.


THE STATE OF WOMEN IN LOUISIANA: A REPORT
4 p.m., Wednesday 22 April

(reschdeduled from Tuesday 21 April)
During Fall 1997 Center Director Beth Willinger and members of her WMST 497: Research in Women's Studies class researched and produced a report on the status of women in Louisana. Willinger and class members will present key findings of the report, and announce the online publication of the report on the Center website.



A PRE-JAZZ FEST WOMAN-POWER HOOTENANY DAY WITH FOLKSINGER JUDY GORMAN
Thursday 23 April
Attend her noontime concert in Pocket Park next to the Tulane University Center, then,
"A HISTORY OF WOMEN AND MUSIC" 7 p.m., Newcomb College Chapel
Judy Gorman's lecture/performance/workshop focused on women's contributions to musics of the world is a wide-ranging consideration of the roles of women in music as music-makers, muses and musical activists. Says Pete Seeger: "Judy Gorman is a wonderful singer and musician...She is always thinking how to hit the nail right on the head, to shoot the arrow straight to the heart of the matter.
This event is co-sponsored with Tulane University Campus Programming and The Office of Multicultural Affairs.



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